Annotated bibliography

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Annotatedbibliography

Thebook “The Things they carried” was written by Tim O’Brien andit is composed of short stories with the main themes revolving aroundthe Vietnam War. This paper will contain the annotated bibliographyof four sources that will be used to interpret the O’Brien’sbook. The four sources are carefully selected to ensure that theyaddress different themes (including the theme of reality versusillusion, social obligation, guilt and shame, and morals and ethics)that are found in O’Brien’s book.

Neill,A. Ethics and the military corporation. CanadianMilitary Journal1 (2000): 27-40. Print.

Neilsees the military as a corporation that should be guided by a set ofethics. From the thesis of the article, failure to observe ethics inthe military corporation has resulted in the public’s lack ofconfidence in the U.S. force and in Canada. Neil holds that ethicsguide the conduct of the military officers, which helps them to offerdefense to the levels that are expected by the members of the public.Neil states that the code of ethics used in the military as aprofession is different from the code applied in other professions.This is because military services involve a voluntary subordinationof the interests of an individual to interests of the state. This isa useful source that will be used to explain how O`Brien advanced thetheme of morals. Donald Neil is a captain in the U.S. military, whichmeans that the author has an experience on the significance of moralsand ethics in the military service. Therefore, the content of thearticle is credible.

Silfver-Kuhalampi,M. Thesources of moral motivation: Studies on empathy, guilt, shame, andvalues.YLiopistonkatu: University of Helsinki Press. Print.

Silfver-Kuhalampidiscussed how different types of emotions motivate people to adoptethical behaviors. Most importantly, the author addresses theinfluence of guilt and shame in human’s motivation to take or avoidtaking certain actions. From the thesis of the book, guilt creates asense of responsibility in an individual for any unwantedconsequences of a given event. Guilt is associated withself-evaluation, which involves a determination of the possibility ofa blame being directed to an individual in case an adverse eventoccurs. Shame arises from a feeling that an adverse event occurredwhen an individual had a given or an inherent responsibility to dowhat is humanly possible to prevent such an occurrence. By using theconcepts discussed in the book, it will be possible to analyze howO’Brien applied the theme of guilt and shame as the key motivatingfactor for the military officers to agree to take part in the VietnamWar. Credentials of Silfver-Kuhalampi are not disclosed in the book,but the fact the book was published by a reputable institution andedited by a group of seven professionals in the field of psychologyimplies that the content is credible.

Swain,R. Theobligations of military professionalism.Fort McNair, DC: National Defense University Press, 2010. Print.

Swaindiscusses the social obligations of military officers. From thethesis of the article, the private conduct of the military officersdepends on the understanding and expectations of the conduct thatshould be associated with the military officers. Similar to othercareers, military officers are guided by specific principles thatdetermine their moral conduct. Swain holds that the competence of themilitary officers may not be sufficient, but their commitment shouldbe accompanied by ethics and discipline. Principles that guidemilitary officers require them to respect their connection with thepeople. Once the military officers respect this connection that theyhave with the civilians, they are able to take up their socialobligations, even in hard times, including the outbreak of war. Thearticle is a useful source that will be used to interpret how O`Brienused the theme of social obligation of the military officers in theevent of an outbreak of the Vietnam War. The article will enhance theunderstanding of the factors the pressured the U.S. military officersto participate in the war, in spite of the perceived danger of doingso. Swain is a senior staff at the Institute for National SecurityEthics and Leadership, which indicates the credibility of thearticle.

Yacobi,G. The human dilemma: life between illusion and reality. Journalof Philosophy of life3.3 (2013): 202-211. Print.

BenYacobi addresses the issue of issue of illusion versus reality andhow the relationship between the two elements affects how peopleunderstand things. From the thesis of the article, disconnect fromreality is unavoidable and human beings are always caught in betweenreality and illusion. Yacobi states that human mind is always in astruggle as people try to find the reality, but they only generatesome theories and concepts that have limitations. These theories andconcepts fail to give the ultimate description of reality because ofhuman inability to access all elements of the underlying reality aswell as the inherent inability of human beings to know all thatremains undiscovered. The article is a useful source that will beused to explaining how Tim O’Brien managed to advance the theme ofreality versus illusions in the book “The Things they carried”.The article is appropriate given that O’Brien uses both figurativeand literal characters. Yacobi is a holder of a PhD degree in thefield of physics, and has worked as a researcher at HarvardUniversity and Imperial College of London. With these credentials andworking experience, Yacobi has the capacity to make authoritativearguments on the theme of reality versus illusion.

Workscited

Neill,A. Ethics and the military corporation. CanadianMilitary Journal1 (2000): 27-40. Print.

Silfver-Kuhalampi,M. Thesources of moral motivation: Studies on empathy, guilt, shame, andvalues.YLiopistonkatu: University of Helsinki Press. Print.

Swain,R. Theobligations of military professionalism.Fort McNair, DC: National Defense University Press, 2010. Print.

Yacobi,G. The human dilemma: life between illusion and reality. Journalof Philosophy of life3.3 (2013): 202-211. Print.