A One-Week Literacy Plan for Children

A ONE-WEEK LITERACY PLAN FOR TWO YEAR OLD CHILDREN 7

AOne-Week Literacy Plan for Children

AOne-Week Literacy Plan for Children

AOne-Week Literacy Plan for Two Year Old Children

DayOne

Inthe first day, the objective is to build a secure foundation forlearning. Thisisgoing to be achieved by first telling each child to name all themembers of their family to create a sense of security in them (Green,2011). Then, we will proceed to form a play song that involvesmentioning family members in turns while clapping in rhythm. An amplecolorful playground is required to get the best results. The successof children in reciting the names of their family members will beused to assess progress at this stage.

DayTwo

Theday two objective is to know each child’s cognitive ability. Theactivity will bedoneby giving them songs to sing, starting with very simple songs, andthen progressively increasing the complexity, as we take notice ofeach child’s learning ability (Jalongo, 2008). The ability to singsongs in different levels of complexity will be used to assess thecognitive ability. Visual images and drawings that relate to thesongs can beused.

DayThree

Thefocus on the third day is to help the children develop healthybodies. Physical activities are one way to engage the concentrationof the children (Hendrick, 2003). The activities recommended aresimple sporting activities like flying kites and chasing bubbles. Therequisite materials here are colorful kites and bubble dispensers.The length of time used in active physical engagement will be used toassess the attainment of the goals of this activity.

DayFour

Inthe fourth day, the goal is to develop the social and emotionalcompetence of children. This aspect can bedoneby organizing the children to interact and play in groups. The firstthing is to identify the abilities and personality of each child.Then, the children will be grouped interchangeably, beginning frompairing them with play partners who have similar personalities, thenprogressively replacing the partners with those of differentpersonalities (Wendt, Quist &amp Lloyd, 2011). The children willlearn how to accommodate diversity and deal with the emotionalchallenges that come with dealing with different kinds ofpersonalities. To facilitate this, the children will requiredifferent playing materials, for example, toys and colored pictures.The reactions to different emotional challenges presented during theinteractions will be recorded to assess the progress under thisobjective.

DayFive

Theobjective of day five is tofoster and encourage the children to be creative. The activities tobe undertaken to achieve this objective should be captivating andpleasing to the children, and since each child is captivated by adifferent activity from another, the materials to facilitate thisshould be as diverse as possible (Jalongo, 2008). Coloringis one example of an activity that can be used to foster the creativeability of children. Many plain pictures of things familiar with thechildren will beprovided,and they will be encouraged to color them. Ability to use the colorsto reproduce the attributes of the real object in the pictures willbe used to assess the creative ability of the children.

DaySix

Onthis day, the program will focus on ways to develop the children’sof language. This exercise will be done by use of visual aid to helpthe children to relate a word to a visual object that they areusedto in their immediate environment. Also, the children will sing themost rudimentary concepts of language like alphabet letters in nicerhythmic songs repeatedly. Therefore, colored pictures of familiarobjects and their corresponding names in colored letters will beprovided for the ability (Hendrick, 2003). After several repetitions,ability recites the basic language concepts progressively will beused to measure the progress registered under this objective.

DaySeven

Theobjective to beachievedin the seventh day is to support the children’s cognitivedevelopment. Theidea is to have the children encourage tothink for themselves. Some activities to engage the children at thispoint is to set up very many different activities like sports,painting, singing and playing with toys, and then let each child toexercise his free will to pursue what he isattractedto (Green, 2011). The elementary teacher will provide toys, coloringpencils and playing materials. The teacher will encourage thechildren to repeat that activity severally. The relevant personnelwill assess Cognitive development by recording the progress in theactivity every time the child repeats it the task.

AOne-Week Literacy Plan for Four Year Old Children

DayOne

Thefirst day’s plan is to build a secure foundation for learning. Thechildren are to be left to interact to know one another by playingtogether and sharing. The presence of parents can be invited to givethe children a feeling of security. Playing space and toys will beprovided, and progress will bemonitoredby the degree of interacting.

DayTwo

Onthe second day, we aim at helping the children to develop healthybodies. This virtue can be achieved through be done by playing games,starting with fewer energy games and to progressing to more vigorousgames like athletics. (Green, 2011) The safety gears and playingmaterials will beprovided.The length of time spent in active participation is the formal toolof assessment.

DayThree

Planningfor is the next objective in line to bepursued.This practice can bedoneby preparing a conducive environment for learning (Hendrick, 2003).The space that will be used for learning will beorganizedand appealing visual materials be displayed on the walls that will beused as learning aids. Charts, pictures,and posters will are a prerequisite for achieving this,and the setting up of learning environment will bemonitoredby ticking the requirements against a checklist when installed.

DayFour

Inthe fourth day, the focus will be on fostering emotional health inthe children. They will be assigned tasks to do for examplearithmetic assignments. Through starting from very simple sums andthen progressing to complex ones, an assessment of their emotionalresponse to the challenge of handling challenging tasks will betaken. As they repeatedly do the tasks until they master it, theywill learn to balance their emotions not to succumb to pressure fromchallenges. The writing materials will beprovided.

DayFive

Fosteringlanguage use is the goal of the teacher will aim to attain on thefifth day. The children will start with describing the familiarobjects provided to them, and then they can progress to formingsimple sentences about the objects. Objects of various kinds offruits will beprovided.Ability to pronounce words well, match objects with theircorresponding names and construct the simple sentences will be usedto assess progress in this area.

DaySix

Thesixth day will be set aside for development of social competencies.The children will engage inactivitiesto establish interpersonal relationships, appreciate diversity indisability issues, culture,and gender (Hendrick, 2003). This activity will be carried out bysetting the children in small groups of members with notablepersonality and physical differences and letting them challenge aproblem by teamwork, for example playing soccer. The soccer balls andplayfield will beprovided,and the progress is monitored by the level of teamwork andcommunication exhibited.

DaySeven

Thefocus of the seventh day will be on refining the creative power ofthe children. The materials that will berequiredhere are plastic for modeling objects and working tables. One willshow the children pictures of objects and be asked to model them withplastic (Green, 2011). The teacher will assess these learningattribute by the closeness of resemblance of the modeled object withthe picture.

References

Green,L. (2011). Learning,teaching, and musical identity.Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Hendrick,J. (2003)Total learning of developmental curriculum forthe young child. UpperSaddle River, N.J. : Merrill/Prentice Hall

Jalongo,M. (2008). Learningto listen, listening to learn.Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of YoungChildren.

Wendt,O., Quist, R., &amp Lloyd, L. (2011). Assistivetechnology.Bingley: Emerald Group Pub.,